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Falling Leaflets
Gradually Green's Debut Project: Find out more about Our First Mission

Find a leaf? We'd love to hear from you! send stories/comments to GraduallyGreen@gmail.com

October 23 through 25, 2006, approximately four hundred leaves were placed around the city of Birmingham, Michigan, written on with facts and statistics about paper waste and recycling. They were left on the windshields of cars parked on the street, in parking lots and garages, and also on parking meters, on the walls of covered walkways, and on office windows and doors. The writing was hand written on the back of leaves, and placed so that they would be read through the surface of the glass (when some one got into their car or sat down at their office desk and looked out the window).

All the leaves were gathered after falling and written on with non-toxic ink. Only plain water was used to stick them to surfaces. They will decay no differently than the rest of the falling leaves of the season.

 

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The goal of this project was to communicate to citizens individually. The leaves were hand written because of their delicacy and some times brittleness, and so that I could work around the prominent veins and still have the writing appear natural. As a collective they added to the peripheral gaze of residents and visitors to Birmingham, as quiet reiterations.

 

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